Sample Lapsits

You are here:
< Back

A word on lapsits

  • If your population is big enough, it is great to break your lapsit programs down into pre-walkers and walkers, but this is not necessary.
  • A typical lapsit program is usually 20 minutes long or so, with playtime at the end.
  • The goal is to introduce caregivers to some new things to do with their children and model key early childhood things, including the value of repetition!  Don’t be afraid to do the same rhymes for many weeks, only changing a few out.  Some people even do the same unison read every single week.
  • If you do themes in your baby storytime, keep some of your rhymes the same regardless of theme.
  • There are a million variations on baby storytime.  Find what works best for you and the families you work with, and don’t be afraid to change things!

Sample Lapsit:  No theme

Greeting   Greet caregivers and babies as they enter the room.

Welcome and Announcements:  Some sample announcements

  • Please don’t expect your baby to sit quietly in your lap at all times–we all understand that their worlds are about movement.  If you see them coming into this special circle, where I have all of my supplies, please redirect them.
  • That being said, if your child is having a hard time today, it is fine to leave and come back in later or try again another day
  • This is a great time to engage with the kids you came with, please turn off your cell phones and enjoy playing with them during storytime

Welcome Song

(to the tune of “Where Is Thumbkin”)

 Where is [insert name here]?  Where is [insert name here]?
There (s)he is!  There (s)he is!  (point to child)
I’m so glad to see you, I’m so glad to see you
Peek-a-boo, Peek-a-boo (Play peek-a-boo with child)

Rhyme

bounce babies/children on lap for this one, then open legs and let them “fall” into the center

Trot, trot to Boston
Trot, trot to Lynn
Look out baby
You’re going to fall in!

(do it twice!)

Rhyme

bounce children on laps for first two lines:
Mother and Father and Uncle John
Went to town, one by one

lean to one side:
Mother fell off

lean to other side:
And Father fell off

back to center and keep bouncing:
But Uncle John went on and on and on and on!

(do it twice!)

Song

“If You’re Happy and You Know It”

Literacy Tip:

I like to make literacy tips natural, not forced.  Put this in your own words, and just work it into the storytime as easily as you can:

Even if you are not a great singer, your little ones don’t care!  You are their favorite singers, and when you sing together it is easier for them to hear the smaller parts of language.

Book:

Try a unison read.  Give everyone a copy of a board book of Brown Bear, Brown Bear, What Do You See  by Bill Martin.  You read the big copy and everyone follows along.

image from Brown Bear, Brown Bear

Rhyme:

Wibbleton to Wobbleton

Start out in a circle.

From Wibbleton to Wobbleton is 15 miles (march in twoard center–paretns can carry pre-walkers)
From Wobbleton to Wibbleton is 15 miles (march backwards)
From Wibbleton to Wobbleton (march in)
From Wobbleton to Wibbleton (march out)
From Wibbleton to Wobbleton is 15 miles!

(do it twice!)

Active Song:

“Can’t Wait to Celebrate” from Jim Gill’s album Irrational Anthem

Active Song

“The Freeze” from Greg and Steve’s Kids in Motion album.  Parents can dance with pre-walkers.  Hand out scarves or shaker eggs before doing this one.  This is fun, plus it gives kids a chance to practice self-control in a fun and playful way.

Rhyme

use your hands to do the motions.Open, shut them
Open, shut them
Give a little clap!
Open, shut them
Open, shut them
Put them in your lap.
Creep them, creep them
Creep them, creep them
Right up to your chin
Open wide your great big mouth
But do not let them in!

Rhyme

use your hands to do the motions, or little finger puppets

Two little blackbirds, sitting on a hill
One named Jack, the other named Jill
Fly away Jack, fly away Jill
Come back Jack, come back Jill

Two little blackbirds, sitting in the snow
One named fast, one named slow
Fly away fast!  Fly away slow
Come back fast!  Come back slow

Book:

I Kissed the Baby by Mary Murphy

I Kissed the Baby book cover

Goodbye Rhyme:

Our hands say thank you with a clap, clap, clap
Our feet say thank you with a tap, tap, tap
Clap, clap, clap; tap, tap, tap
We roll our hands around and wave Good bye!

Playtime:

Set out books for checkout and play, blocks, small soft balls, trucks, sorting projects, or even some art supplies and allow for at least 15 minutes of social play time.  This not only validates the importance of play time for children and parents, it allows you to model it and gives young children a chance to learn important skills about interacting with their peers.

Sample Lapsit Storytime:  Farm Animals

Greeting:  Greet everyone as they come in

Welcome and Announcements:  Today we are going to talk about animals who live on a farm

Hello Song:

Let’s all bounce with (child’s name)
Let’s all bounce with (child’s name)
Bouncing and bouncing and bouncing around
Let’s all bounce with (child’s name)

Rhyme:

bounce babies/children on lap for this one, then open legs and let them “fall” into the center

Trot, trot to Boston
Trot, trot to Lynn
Look out baby
You’re going to fall in!

(do it twice!)

Rhyme

bounce children on laps for first two lines:
Mother and Father and Uncle John
Went to town, one by one

lean to one side:
Mother fell off

lean to other side:
And Father fell off

back to center and keep bouncing:
But Uncle John went on and on and on and on!

(do it twice!)

Rhyme

Hickety, pickety my black hen
She lays eggs for gentlemen
Gentlement come, every day
To see what my black hen doth lay

Song (with optional flannel board)
Baa, Baa Black Sheep

Literacy Tip:

When you point out pictures to your children as you are reading, you are helping build their vocabulary and ability to understand symbols.

Book (unison read)

I Went Walking by Susan Williams

I Went Walking book cover

Song:

Old MacDonald

Song:

Bumping Up and Down in My Little Red Wagon

Scarf Dance:

Pass out scarves and dance around the room to some peppy music.  Pre-walkers can be held by a grown-up

(tip:  if you are dancing/playing with a baby, try playing peekaboo!  Not only is it fun, it also helps them develop the concept of object permanence)

Rhyme:

Hickory Dickory Dare
The pig flew up in the air (pretend to fly around the room with arms outstretched, or caregivers can “fly” the pre-walkers around)
Farmer Brown soon brought her down (sit back down)
Hickory Dickory Dare

(repeat at least once!)

Rhyme:

Warm hands warm (rub hands together)
The men have gone to plow
If you want to warm your hands
Warm your hands now.

Book:

Clip Clop by Nicola Smee

Cover of Clip-Clop book

Goodbye Song:

The More We Get Together (you can include other actions, too)

Playtime:

Set out books for checkout and play, blocks, small soft balls, trucks, sorting projects, or even some art supplies and allow for at least 15 minutes of social play time.  This not only validates the importance of play time for children and parents, it allows you to model it and gives young children a chance to learn important skills about interacting with their peers.